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Context, site and program: Meet the next architect for MPavilion – Carme Pinós

Carme Pinós will be the first Spanish architect to join the ranks as a designer of Melbourne’s MPavilion. We meet with her to find out what’s in store and what to expect.

  • Carme Pinós photographed by Miquel Tres.



BY

February 13th, 2018


Now in its fifth iteration, the annual summer pavilion that takes up residence in Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Gardens continues to gain momentum. With the 2017 program only just finished up, the next architect off the ranks has been announced. 

Indesign speaks with Carme Pinós, founder of Estudio Carme Pinós, to find out how the architect approaches design and how it might influence the next temporary pavilion.

Pinós has visited Australia multiple times and each time she continues to learn the cultural and historical context of our country. It’s this understanding and engagement that informs Pinós’ process.

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“For me, it’s very important to know the context, but not only the physical context, also the cultural context.” – Carme Pinós
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“I have a way to start always. The thing I have clear when I start a project is what I don’t want, more than the thing that I do want.

“And from there, I get a direction from observing the site. For me, it’s very important to know the context, but not only the physical context, also the cultural context. When I visit a place I try to understand the culture, I read about the culture and the history of the site. It’s also important to perceive the natural topography of the site,” explains Pinós.

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“Then I need to understand the program, but not in sense of metres…” – Carme Pinós
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From here the architect considers the programmatic requirements, “Then I need to understand the program, but not in sense of metres, more the relationships that happen between a person and the space,” adds Pinós.

The process that Pinós follows fits into a perfect metaphor. “I often say that an architect is closer to a film director than a sculptor. A film director works with human feelings, behaviours and atmosphere. Before you start a project, you must write a script,” says the architect.

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“An architect is closer to a film director than a sculptor.” – Carme Pinós
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“How do you want people to move, the relations, you must know what kind of relations you want to provoke. All that must be very clear before you start to design.

“We are not sculptors just deciding how you think something looks. We work with the lives of people. Architecture works with the feelings and the life of other people and we must have that very clear from the beginning,” says Pinós.

It seems to be a fitting analogy for the architect who will set the stage for the next production of the pavilion – with a range and variety of interactions and performances that will take place under its roof.

What exact form will it take? That is yet to be revealed. In the meantime, we can be rest assured that it will consider the history and culture of Melbourne while being an inclusive space for its visitors.

For now, take a look back at the previous MPavilion designed by Pritzker-prize winner Rem Koolhaas, with David Gianotten of OMA.


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