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Living the High Line in NYC

Section 2 of New York’s High Line park opened to the public on Wednesday June 8.



BY jesse

June 10th, 2011


Running along the lower west side of Manhattan, the High Line is a disused elevated railway line that has been undergoing redesign as an aerial greenway since 2004.

 

One of the most important urban renewal projects of recent times, the High Line exemplifies the power of green public spaces in revitalising forgotten areas and encouraging pedestrian traffic, as well as promoting urban development in the immediate surrounds.

The southern section of the park opened to the public in 2009; the newly opened 2nd section marks the culmination of a further 2 years of work on the 2.33 km railway.

 

Designers James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro have created a green space that is set to grow and evolve over the coming years.

Visitors first encounter The Thicket – a stretch of dense foliage – before reaching the Sun Lawn, a patch of grass on a huge concrete slab overlooking the surrounding neighbourhoods.

 

 

The Falcone Flyover leads pedestrians further via an elevated catwalk to the Viewing Spur, a rest area within what was once an advertising billboard.

 

 

The Wildflower Field is populated by native grasses and flowers; at The Cutout the original rail line is exposed, harking back to the history of what’s underfoot.

 

 

The last section of the High Line and its rail yards remains unfinished and its future is uncertain. Preservation society Friends of the High Line are working to acquire this site so that the development can continue.

 

Friends of the High Line
thehighline.org


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